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Support for unlicensed users => Post here if you can't find your License Key => Topic started by: Michael Betke on February 14, 2011, 04:19:21 pm

Title: Internal texture compression?
Post by: Michael Betke on February 14, 2011, 04:19:21 pm
I've learned that I can import or use any image I want to. No matter if it's a power of two image like in games or .tga, .tiff or .dds.

 

One thing what I don't know is the internal handling of the images I use.

If I use 10 .dds files they are smaller as 10 .tiff images in most cases and more friendly to system resources.

 

Or can I use whatever I like and Lumion convertes to a specific file format during import?
Title: Internal texture compression?
Post by: Aaron on February 14, 2011, 05:08:38 pm
If you mean something like UDK importing and converting every file to .dds then no, Lumion doesn't do that, so it's pretty sensible to use

the best format that doesnt ruin quality to save system resources and most importantly GPU mem.
Title: Internal texture compression?
Post by: Ferry on February 15, 2011, 10:42:00 am
Using DDS does help it shows you better the memory that is using in Lumion!
Title: Internal texture compression?
Post by: Michael Betke on February 15, 2011, 06:05:42 pm
Okay then I'll stay with .dds textures. :)

 

One thing with .ds exporter is it needs a power of two texture. So for some special textures I will use .tiff or even a .jpg.
Title: Internal texture compression?
Post by: Ferry on February 16, 2011, 09:41:44 am
You don't need to use power of two indeed.
Title: Internal texture compression?
Post by: Michael Betke on February 16, 2011, 09:44:32 am
the photoshop .dds exporter (nvidia texture tools) only exports to .dds format if i use power of two. It just dont save the file with another size.
Title: Internal texture compression?
Post by: Morten on February 16, 2011, 01:35:07 pm
Michael said:

 One thing with .ds exporter is it needs a power of two texture. So for some special textures I will use .tiff or even a .jpg.





Yup, this is indeed the optimal way to do it.