Author Topic: Classical Conservatory  (Read 359 times)

CSO_Arch

    Reputation: 2
Classical Conservatory
« on: June 03, 2019, 07:00:43 pm »
June 03, 2019, 07:00:43 pm
These are fictional renderings of a space I imagined last winter when I was dreaming of warmer weather...
Made using Sketchup 2017, Lumion 8.0, and some light post in Photoshop. Total time was about 3 weeks, with 3-4 minute wait times for each image. I used an Alienware Aurora R7, GTX 1080, 16gb ram. Almost all materials are custom and utilize the alpha channel.

martinch

    Reputation: 8
Re: Classical Conservatory
« Reply #1 on: June 03, 2019, 07:27:09 pm »
June 03, 2019, 07:27:09 pm
These look great, what a great mood and color palette.
You should do a short animation of it!
Thanks for sharing.

Martin

Derekw

    Reputation: 34
Re: Classical Conservatory
« Reply #2 on: June 04, 2019, 06:33:47 am »
June 04, 2019, 06:33:47 am
Lovely work! Very realistic. The materials are perfect.
Sketchup Pro - Z390 Aorus Ultra - i9 9900K 3.60 GHz - Corsair Vengeance LPX 32 GB - Asus RTX 2080 Ti Turbo 11 GB - Samsung 970 Evo Plus 1 TB - Corsair AX850 Titanium.

bearchitecture

    Reputation: 0
Re: Classical Conservatory
« Reply #3 on: June 04, 2019, 08:06:25 am »
June 04, 2019, 08:06:25 am
Holy MOLEY!

How?!

This answers a question I was about to post actually of: "how do you get moody interior renders" because all the ones we come out with are too light and bright.

Nice in a way, but more often than not you're trying to sell a 'feel' with an interior and these nail it.

How much post-production was used? What was the effects stack like? How did you get such a soft feel?

So many questions!

Michael

CSO_Arch

    Reputation: 2
Re: Classical Conservatory
« Reply #4 on: June 04, 2019, 04:05:07 pm »
June 04, 2019, 04:05:07 pm
Thank you! I wish I had a better answer for you than "trial and error", but that's a large part of it!
Unfortunately I had a computer issue recently and had to do a hard reset. Everything was lost, including this Lumion file and all the details that went with it. I certainly learned my lesson about backing up.

I can give you a brief rundown of what I remember, though. I always have omnishadow all the way up, and I tend to keep shadow brightness pretty low. I've begun using both noise and chromatic aberrations very subtly. The scene was lit using only sunlight and one spotlight above the fireplace. Global illumination was kept pretty low to avoid color bleed. Lens flare was turned up just enough to get a nice glow from the pendants and fireplace. The only post production I did in Photoshop was tweaking the levels slightly and turning down the saturation a bit.

In short, it's a combination of a lot of effects used subtly! I used to be more hung up on photo realism until I came to the conclusion that communicating the "feel" of a space is a more worthwhile pursuit. I'm sure you can understand how being trapped in the cold seasons led me to create such a warm looking space.

bearchitecture

    Reputation: 0
Re: Classical Conservatory
« Reply #5 on: June 05, 2019, 05:30:05 am »
June 05, 2019, 05:30:05 am
Definitely.

That's the thing we're struggling with when using Lumion in the offce - more often than not it's about communicating the feel rather being being insanely realistic.

Will give those suggestions a go, thank you very much!

Were they tweaks from the 'interior' default setting? Or nothing else other than those few FX you mentioned?

Thanks a lot.

Michael

CSO_Arch

    Reputation: 2
Re: Classical Conservatory
« Reply #6 on: June 05, 2019, 04:00:51 pm »
June 05, 2019, 04:00:51 pm
I've found that in a work context, photorealism can actually be a hindrance. The client typically gets distracted and focuses on nitpicking details that distract from the overall intent. The images I posted above are just a personal side project I did in my spare time to see how far I could push it. I have a few other projects I'll post before long. We get so many requests and revisions that very few projects have enough time to really make them spectacular.

I've toyed around with the preset modes, but I don't really use them. At this point I've got a pretty standard stack that I use: sun, shadow, reflection, global illumination, hyperlight, sky light (only on interiors, though. Skylight oddly seems to darken exterior shots, even with brightness all the way up), 2 point perspective, depth of field, lens flare, chromatic aberrations, fog (for atmospheric scattering), color correction, noise, and sharpen.

marc1205

    Reputation: 0
Re: Classical Conservatory
« Reply #7 on: June 11, 2019, 06:48:19 pm »
June 11, 2019, 06:48:19 pm
I've found that in a work context, photorealism can actually be a hindrance. The client typically gets distracted and focuses on nitpicking details that distract from the overall intent.

Couldn't agree more, evoking a feel of the surroundings/project is far more powerful in selling a concept for either marketing or indeed planning purposes.